Authors: L. Meijerman & S.A. Ulenberg (Zoological Museum, University of Amsterdam)
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Scientific name:

Cydia duplicana

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Cydia cosmophorana
Cydia fagiglandana - Beech moth

Author: (Zetterstedt, 1839)

Species Overview:

Adult: 13-19 mm wingspan; forewing olive-brown (distal area finely irrorate with yellow-ochreous) with a narrow medio-dorsal patch, usually divided medially by a brown line; interspaces between brown costal strigulae white, some producing metallic plumbeous or whitish striae towards termen; ocellus well developed, edged laterally by plumbeous or whitish streaks, and containing four black longitudinal dashes. Hindwing dark fuscous.
Larva: head brown; prothoracic plate blackish-brown; body dirty white; anal plate weakly sclerotized.
Pupa: pale brown; frons rounded.

Taxonomic Description:

Male:

Cydia duplicana adult 1
Cydia duplicana adult 2
External characters: 13-19 mm wingspan. Forewing ground colour white suffused and overlaid with olive-brown except interspaces between brown costal strigulae, some of the interspaces producing metallic plumbeous or whitish striae (two of which continue to termen), and a narrow medio-dorsal patch which is curved towards termen and usually divided medially by a brown line; distal area finely irrorate with yellow-ochreous; ocellus well developed, edged laterally by plumbeous or whitish streaks, and containing four black longitudinal dashes; cilia greyish-brown with blackish sub-basal line. Hindwing dark fuscous; cilia yellowish-white with dark brown sub-basal line.

male gen. Cydia duplicana
Genitalia: Ventral margin of valva with deep semi-circular notch; neck comparatively long. Apex of sacculus triangular. Aedeagus slender.

Female:

External characters: Similar to male.

female gen. Cydia duplicana
Genitalia: Seventh sternite broadens notably towards anterior margin. Lamella postvaginalis a semi-square with elongate corners both posteriorly and anteriorly. Ductus bursae narrow, with small antrum.

Variation:

Cydia duplicana adult 3
Specimens from Greece have narrower, more reddish tinged forewings and paler hindwings.

Biology:

There is one generation yearly. The species overwinters in the larval stage. Larvae can be found in resin deposits and thickened branches infested by fungi, and in mechanical injuries of spruce, fir, pine and juniper. Moths fly from May or June until the end of July.

Host plants:

Abies alba Picea excelsa, Juniperus, Pinus.

Damage:

Larvae can be found in resin deposits and thickened branches infested by fungi, and in mechanical injuries of spruce, fir, pine and juniper. The species itself does not appear to be of much economic importance because larvae only mine to the nearest injury on the bark.

Distribution:

Europe to Western Russia, Trans-Caucasus, Turkestan and Kazakhstan.

Pheromone:

Pheromone unknown.

Attractantia:

E 8E 10-12Ac (Witzgall et al., 1996b)



Cydia indivisa (Danilevsky)

This species has often been confused with Cydia indivisa. The larvae of this species also mine in the bark of Abies, Picea and Pinus, and can also be found on Larix. The species occurs from Western Europe to the southern part of Eastern Russia.

Cydia indivisa adult
In Cydia indivisa, the whitish medio-dorsal patch on the forewing is not divided by a brown line. The genitalia offer better characters for identification:

male gen. Cydia indivisa
Cucullus is elongated and demarcated from rest of valva by an oblique convex ridge; aedeagus fairly broad.

female gen. Cydia indivisa
Postvaginal plate long, posterior margin concave. Ductus bursae sclerotized.

Males are attracted by a mixture of Z 8-12OH and E 8-12OH (1:1)
and also by a mixture of E 8-12Ac and Z 8-12Ac (1:1).

Cydia duplicana
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Cydia duplicana
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